About the MetroWest Visitors Bureau

About the MetroWest Visitors Bureau

As the only regional organization with the mission of stimulating the MetroWest economy by marketing the region's assets, we have served hundreds of businesses, nonprofit agencies, and municipalities since our founding four years ago. This independent nonprofit organization markets the region’s cultural and recreational venues, retailers, restaurants, accommodations, and educational and other services to visitors and residents alike. These marketing efforts also serve to brand the region, build collaborations across sectors and towns, support jobs-producing enterprises, and make residents and employees proud of where they live and work. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts matches each dollar raised by the Visitors Bureau, which doubles the impact of every revenue source.

As a regional economic development initiative, our MWVB is working not only to attract travelers to the area, but to guide local residents looking for a service, family activity, fantastic meal, cultural experience, getaway, and more.  Our goal is to compile all that the region has to offer and then make this compelling information as accessible as possible to a host of audiences.

By showing off the best of MetroWest, we’ll be giving more people more great reasons to spend more dollars right here.

Who benefits?  The benefits of an RTC aren’t limited to organizations who cater to visitors.  In addition to the hospitality and restaurant industries, the MWVB works directly with sports and recreation, retail, cultural and historical attractions, performing arts, and community gatherings such as street fairs and farmers’ markets. 

By bringing more visitors to our region, and by encouraging residents to “visit” other venues in their own backyard, our work yields significant tax revenue for our municipalities and for the Commonwealth’s general fund.

The MWVB is truly a collaborative effort, with the heads of four area Chambers of Commerce serving on our Founding Board of Directors along with representatives of major attractions, the hospitality industry, colleges and universities, and historical and cultural nonprofit organizations.

The result of four years of study and discussion by the Creative Economy Initiative (see History), the MWVB knows that a collaborative effort, with diverse representation and with plenty of avenues for communication and input, not only puts MetroWest on the map, but keeps revenue right here at home.

Financial support:  As a designated RTC, the MWVB is eligible for state funding through the Massachusetts Office of Travel & Tourism.  Currently, we are grateful for a matching grant of state funds, which matches, dollar-for-dollar, the revenue we bring in through other means, such as sponsorships, advertising, and other fee-for-services.  For information about our Sponsor program, please contact Michele Marotta at michele@metrowestvisitors.org

Community Spotlight: Ashland

The Town of Ashland bustles year ‘round, but spring is an especially energetic season as the town’s cultural and business initiatives roll out.  Although primarily residential, the town integrates small businesses as well as cutting-edge tech corporations into its community initiatives.

 

New England History

Centuries ago, Ashland was a stopping point on a major Indian trail which later became known as the Bay Path, connecting Cambridge and Connecticut. It was here that a community of Natick Indians was established as the Village of Magunkaquog in about 1659. The town is also known as the site of Henry Warren's invention of the electric clock, later manufactured here under the Telechron name. Today, the high school’s teams are the Clockers.

 

Corner Spot

Indicative of the energetic business community emerging in this town, the Corner Spot was developed in early 2017--through individual donations—as a place for new businesses to debut for one to six weeks. Opening in June of 2017, this innovative example of community placemaking will offer a rotation of new enterprises, as well as a restful spot for simply hanging out.

 

Farmers Market

One of the region’s most robust farmers’ markets offers special themes—such as Dog Day --each Saturday morning (June 10-October 7) as well as live music, non-food vendors, and family activities in the park at 125 Front Street. On special weekends throughout the rest of the year, the Farmers Market pops up indoors to offer Pre-Thanksgiving and Mid-Winter Markets.

 

Special community events

Long a home to annual community events and festivals, such as Ashland Day in September, the town now offers more programming through Arts!Ashland Alliance. Through arts and culture programming, the group also works to cultivate the economic vitality of the community. Its signature event is the Dragon Fly Festival, held mid-August.  Other cultural offerings come from the Friends of the Ashland Library, which offers speakers and documentary film evenings.

 

Dining

Pockets of great cuisine are spread throughout this community of 18,000, including along Routes 126 and 135, as well as downtown sidestreets. The gourmet Oregon Club, a former speakeasy, is tucked among residences in east Ashland.  In downtown, Stone’s Public House (circa 1832) boasts a ghostly history and modern hearty pub fare. New Mexican and Asian eateries have debuted in recent years as well.

 

Recreation & Sports

To commemorate the site of the original Boston Marathon Start Line, Ashland now boasts Marathon Park., which is now the site of the start line of the semi-annual Marathon Park Prep, a half-marathon favored by runners eager to experience a large portion of the Boston Marathon’s April route.

There’s plenty of recreation for those inclined to relax. The 470-acre Ashland State Park offers swimming, picnic areas, boating, fishing, and hiking/biking trails. The Bay Circuit Trail connects Ashland to 34 other communities. The public schools’ new turf fields are the site of regional sports competitions.