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Education & Learning

Special Lecture Event: The Birds of Cuba, A New Era for Knowledge

09.20.19 at 7:30 PM - Mass Audubon's Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary
Mass Audubon's Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary 280 Eliot St., Natick, MA 01760
Website
Adults: $15 Members; $18 Non-Members, Child $8m/ $

Cuba, the Caribbean's largest and most ecologically diverse island, is a paradise for the visiting naturalist. There are more than 285 regularly occurring bird species and 23 species are found nowhere else. Unique and important birding areas such as the Zapata Peninsula, and the beautiful western province of Pinar del Rio, host such colorful and unusual species as Cuban trogan, Cuban tody and Fernandina flicker. Nils will be presenting selections from his latest book The Birds of Cuba. Each species features beautiful photographs and newly updated information. Much has been learned in recent years thanks to new scientific approaches and conservation efforts as well as through citizen science and the roles of eBird, Digital Photography and social media. Pre-registration recommended. Online registration available.

Education & Learning

Garden Design with Native Plants

09.21.19 at 10:00 AM - Mass Audubon's Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary
Mass Audubon's Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary 280 Eliot St., Natick, MA 01760
Website
Adults $40 Members, $55 Non-Members

Learn the basics of designing a garden and how to incorporate native plants! Native plants can be beautiful and are a great way to attract wildlife such as butterflies and birds to your garden. Identify planting goals and learn techniques to balance form (height/shape/leaf texture, etc.), function (habitat, screening, shade, flowers/fruit, etc.), seasonality, and site conditions (woodland, wetland, meadow, etc.). Using plants in Broadmoor's Nature Play Area native plants garden (designed by CBA), we will look at design, how to use design to attract wildlife and basic plant ID. A great chance to bring your garden design questions! This class will run rain or shine as the garden can be viewed from inside or out. Pre-registration required. Online registration available. Megan Tomkins is a principal and registered Landscape Architect at CBA Landscape Architects LLC in Cambridge, MA. She holds a BS from Cornell University; interned at the Arnold Arboretum after college; has done continuing education in invasive plant management through Umass Amherst; and she recently sat on the Cambridge Urban Forest Master Plan Task Force. Much of her professional work focuses on the design of public parks and playgrounds throughout Eastern Massachusetts. She always enjoys problem solving in the fields of horticulture, wetlands, and invasive plants.

Education & Learning

Wild about Turtles

09.21.19 at 1:00 PM - Mass Audubon's Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary
Mass Audubon's Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary 280 Eliot St., Natick, MA 01760
Website
Adult $13 Members / $15 Non-Members, Child $7m/ $9

Visit "up close and personal" with some of the turtles found around Broadmoor. Can turtles really leave their shells like they do in the cartoons? What is the difference between a turtle and a tortoise? Find out for yourself! Learn more about our wonderful shelled friends and take a short walk to see more turtles in the wild. Pre-registration recommended. Online registration available.

Education & Learning

Newhouse Center Faculty Series: Nikki Greene

09.23.19 at 4:30 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

In this presentation, Newhouse Center faculty fellow Nikki Greene discusses her ongoing research project, “Sugar makes me cry”: María Magdalena Campos-Pons and the Performance of Bittersweet Histories. The performances of the Cuban-born artist María Magdalena Campos-Pons articulate her radical vision of the resiliency of enslaved Africans and their descendants, and the power of black women’s bodies in particular, in ways that seamlessly encompass the worlds of Afro-Cuba and the United States. Focusing on Campos-Pons’ exhibition Alchemy of the Soul: María Magdalena Campos-Pons at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Mass., in 2016, Greene will discuss how her performance of Remedios (Remedies), along with sculpture, installation, photography, and video, skillfully document the direct bittersweet histories, or historias agridulces, of Cuba and Massachusetts. The sonic compositions of Campos-Pons’ collaborator, Neil Leonard, and selections from the rumba singer Rafael “El Niño” Navarro complement the gallery experience as a journey through Campos-Pons’s native Matanzas, a center of Afro-Cuban culture, to Salem, a key location for the triangular trade of enslaved people and of goods (sugar, rum, and cod fish, for example). The late Afro-Cuban singer Celia Cruz, who proclaimed “¡azúcar!” as a complex affirmation of her own blackness, makes for a productive comparison. Both Campos-Pons and Cruz chronicle—and embody—the narrative of sugar and rum production, of enslaved laborers and suffering, and, ultimately, death, by means of performance and visual and sound aesthetics. Nikki Greene is an assistant professor of art at Wellesley College. For more information, please contact: Lauren Cote, lcote2@wellesley.edu Image Caption: María Magdalena Campos-Pons looking at factory Sergio Gonzales (formerly Tinguaro). Image Credit: Emily Fry/PEM

Education & Learning

Women Filmmakers at Wellesley: The Role of the Producer

09.24.19 at 4:00 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

In this interactive presentation, independent film producer Linda Reisman will discuss the roles of the creative producer, line producer, and executive producer in film making. She will also explain the process and work that is involved from the development of a script to the film’s distribution. Reception with refreshments served. Linda Reisman is an independent film producer and senior distinguished producer-in-residence in the Department of Visual & Media at Emerson College. Her most recent film, Leave No Trace, premiered at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival and internationally in the Directors Fortnight section of the Cannes Film Festival. Other notable work include The Danish Girl (2015) and Affliction (1997). For more information, please contact: Margaret Cezair-Thompson, mcezaire@wellesley.edu Generously supported by: The English and Creative Writing Department, co-sponsored by the CLCE.

Education & Learning

Hollywood’s Dirtiest Secret: The Hidden Environmental Costs of the Movies

09.26.19 at 4:30 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

A Lecture by Hunter Vaughan (University of Colorado Boulder) Hunter Vaughan's most recent book, Hollywood’s Dirtiest Secret: The Hidden Environmental Cost of the Movies (Columbia University Press, 2019), offers a new history of the movies from an environmental perspective, arguing that how we make and consume films has serious ecological consequences. In an era when many businesses have come under scrutiny for their environmental impact, the film industry has, for the most part, escaped criticism and regulation. Its practices are more diffuse, its final product less tangible, and Hollywood has adopted public-relations strategies that portray it as environmentally conscious. Bringing together environmental humanities, science communication, and social ethics, Hollywood’s Dirtiest Secret is a pathbreaking consideration of the film industry’s environmental impact that examines how our cultural prioritization of spectacle has distracted us from its material consequences and natural-resource use. Vaughan examines the environmental effects of filmmaking from Hollywood classics to the digital era, considering how popular screen media shape and reflect our understanding of the natural world. He recounts the production histories of major blockbusters—Gone with the Wind, Singin’ in the Rain, Twister, and Avatar—situating them in the contexts of the development of the film industry, popular environmentalism, and the proliferation of digital technologies. Emphasizing the materiality of media, Vaughan interweaves details of the hidden environmental consequences of specific filmmaking practices, from water use to server farms, within a larger critical portrait of social perceptions and valuations of the natural world. Generously supported by: The Newhouse Center for the Humanities, Cinema and Media Studies, and the Paulsen Ecology of Place Initiative. Image Caption: Hunter Vaughan

Education & Learning

More Than “Just Uhura”: Understanding Star Trek’s Lt. Uhura, Civil Rights, and Space History

09.26.19 at 7:00 PM - Framingham State University
100 State Street, Framingham, MA 01701
Website
Free

Introduced in 1966, Lt. Uhura is arguably the most historically significant character of the Star Trek franchise. She was a woman of color depicted in popular culture during a period of tremendous change for African Americans and women. Dr. Margaret Weitekamp from the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum invites us to explore the impact of Lt. Uhura on American culture and society!

Education & Learning

Newhouse Faculty Series: Julie Walsh, Nicolas Malebranche, Eve, and the Fall of Eden

10.01.19 at 4:30 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

Newhouse Center faculty fellow Julie Walsh discusses her latest research, which explores the question of whether women are intrinsically morally corrupt. Eve’s role in the fall of Eden might suggest that they are, but Walsh argues that what happened in the garden is much more complicated. Walsh will discuss how the French priest and philosopher Nicolas Malebranche’s views on women are not a damning as they first appear by following the thread of his discussion of Eve, original sin, and the fall of Eden. Julie Walsh is an assistant professor of philosophy at Wellesley College. For more information, please contact: Lauren Cote, lcote2@wellesley.edu

Education & Learning

Fall Colors Photography Workshop

10.05.19 at 1:00 PM - Mass Audubon's Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary
Mass Audubon's Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary 280 Eliot St., Natick, MA 01760
Website
Adults $60 Members, $75 Non-Members

Join us in the midst of fall colors as we work with exposure, reflections and other techniques to create dramatic effects with fall foliage. From telephoto lenses to macro to wide angle, there are many options to capture the beauty of fall foliage. Bring a tripod to help work with long exposures and capturing motion in your photos. Small class size for individual attention. Pre-registration required. Online registration available. Ethan Gordon is a widely published photojournalist and former photography magazine editor. He teaches several different photography classes at Broadmoor.

Education & Learning

Mira Jacob: “Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations”

10.07.19 at 4:30 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

Author Mira Jacob joins us for a discussion of her latest book, Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations. Mira Jacob is the author and illustrator of Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations (2019). Her critically acclaimed novel The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing was a Barnes & Noble Discover New Writers pick, shortlisted for India’s Tata First Literature Award, and longlisted for the Brooklyn Literary Eagles Prize. Her writing and drawings have appeared in the New York Times, Electric Literature, Tin House, Literary Hub, Guernica, Vogue, the Telegraph, and BuzzFeed. She has a drawn column on Shondaland. Image Credit: In Kim Image Caption: Mira Jacob

Education & Learning

Artist Skype Talk Series: Haley Morris-Cafiero

10.08.19 at 2:00 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

The first in a series of three conversations via Skype between Davis curators and artists Haley Morris-Cafiero, Habiba Nowrose, and Fatimah Tuggar. Haley Morris-Cafiero (b. 1976, Memphis, Tenn.) holds an MFA from the University of Arizona and is a lecturer in photography at the Belfast School of Art at Ulster University, Ireland. She was nominated for a Prix Pictet in 2014 and was a 2016 Fulbright finalist. She has had solo exhibitions at UPI Gallery in New York, the University of Dayton, and at the Centre de la Photographie Genève in Geneva, Switzerland For more information, please contact: 781-283-2051 Image Credit: Museum purchase with funds given through the generosity of Linda Wyatt Gruber (Class of 1966), E.2019.10.3 Image Caption: Haley Morris-Cafiero, Sunscreen, 2015, digital print, 24 in. x 24 in.

Education & Learning

Bradley Campbell: Dignity in an Era of Victimhood and Incivility

10.10.19 at 4:30 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

Does dignity still matter? In recent years, new rivals to dignity culture have emerged, and whether it is in our politics or at our universities, victimhood and incivility often seem to prevail. Dignity is not dead, though, and it can provide an alternative to recent moral trends—one that might lead to greater happiness, civility, and justice. Bradley Campbell is a professor of sociology at California State University, Los Angeles. He is broadly interested in the study of moral conflict—clashes of right and wrong—and had written mostly about law, violence, and genocide until he began more recently to examine the conflicts on college campuses over microaggressions, safe spaces, trigger warnings, and free speech, which he will address in this lecture. He is the author of The Geometry of Genocide: A Study in Pure Sociology and coauthor (with Jason Manning of West Virginia University) of The Rise of Victimhood Culture: Microaggressions, Safe Spaces, and the New Culture Wars. For more information, please contact: Caryn Sowa, csowa@wellesley.edu Image Caption: Bradley Campbell

Education & Learning

The Future of Space Exploration: An Ethical Perspective

10.16.19 at 7:00 PM - Framingham State University
100 State Street Framingham, MA 02019
Website
Free, but registration is required.

The Space Age made clear the consequences of living in an interdependent world and gave us new perspectives on planet Earth. One was to address the legacy of colonialism as decolonization. The other was the role of human activity in changing the physical system of the Earth, altering our climate. Dr. Martin Collins from the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum invites us to examine how we might make choices as individuals, communities, and nations to resolve the issues before us.

Education & Learning

The Diane Silvers Ravitch ’60 Lecture: Eve L. Ewing

10.17.19 at 7:30 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

In this talk, sociologist of education Eve L. Ewing presents her book Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago's South Side (2018). She will talk about the story of Chicago's 2013 mass public school closures—the largest wave of such closures in the nation's history. The event will include a reading of excerpts from the books and a discussion of the lessons the book presents about history, segregation, racism, and the future of America’s public schools. The talk will be followed by a question and answer session. Eve L. Ewing is an assistant professor in the University of Chicago’s School of Social Service Administration. She is a qualitative sociologist of education whose work is centered around two primary questions: First, how do racism and other large-scale structures of social inequality impact the everyday lives and experiences of young people? Second, how can K–12 public school systems serve to interrupt or perpetuate these social problems, and what role can educators, policymakers, families, community members, and young people themselves play in understanding, acknowledging, and disrupting them? Professor Ewing’s scholarship, community work, and classroom teaching are aimed at expanding the ways that urban school stakeholders, other researchers, and the broader public can be equipped to understand, respond to, and ultimately dismantle white supremacy and to make school systems liberatory institutions rather than oppressive ones. Her book Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago’s South Side was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2018. She also writes in other genres for broad audiences; she is the author of the poetry collections Electric Arches and 1919 and writes the Ironheart series for Marvel Comics. Her work has appeared in many venues, including Poetry Magazine, The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Nation, The Washington Post, and The New Republic. Professor Ewing is a faculty affiliate at the University of Chicago’s Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality. Prior to joining SSA, Professor Ewing completed her doctoral studies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. While there, she served as editor and co-chair of the Harvard Educational Review. She then completed a Provost’s Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Chicago. She also holds a Master of Education degree in education policy and management from Harvard University, a Master of Arts in Teaching degree in elementary education from Dominican University, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in English Language and Literature from the University of Chicago. For more information, please contact: Soo Hong, shong@wellesley.edu Generously supported by: Diane Silvers Ravitch Class of ’60 Lecture Series Gift. Image Caption: Eve. L. Ewing

Education & Learning

Artist Skype Talk Series: Habiba Nowrose

10.18.19 at 11:00 AM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

Second in a series of three conversations via Skype between Davis curators and artists Haley Morris-Cafiero, Habiba Nowrose, and Fatimah Tuggar. Habiba Nowrose (b. 1989, Dhaka, Bangladesh) holds an MS in women’s and gender studies from the University of Dhaka and is currently enrolled in the Professional Program on Photography at the Pathshala South Asian Media Institute. Her series, Concealed, was a finalist for the 2018 Invisible Photographers Awards. For more information, please contact: 781-283-2051 Image Credit: Museum purchase with funds given through the generosity of Linda Wyatt Gruber (Class of 1966), 2018.291 Image Caption: Habiba Nowrose, Concealed, 2017, inkjet print, 31 ½ in. x 20 ? in. (80 cm x 53 cm)

Education & Learning

Putin’s World: Russia Against the West and With the Rest

10.23.19 at 8:00 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

Angela Stent, professor of government and foreign service at Georgetown University, discusses her new book, Putin’s World: Russia Against the West and With the Rest, in which she explores the ambitions, successes, and challenges of Putin’s Russia on the global stage. How did Russia manage to emerge resurgent on the world stage and play a weak hand so effectively? Or has Russia stepped into a vacuum created by the West’s distraction with its own domestic problems and U.S. ambivalence about whether it still wants to act as a superpower? Stent will shed light on the country’s turbulent past and how it has influenced Putin, the Russians’ understanding of their position on the global stage and their future ambitions–and their conviction that the West has tried to deny them a seat at the table of great powers since the U.S.S.R. collapsed. This presentation will help Americans understand how and why the post-Cold War era has given way to a new, more dangerous world, one in which Russia poses a challenge to the United States in every corner of the globe–and one in which Russia has become a toxic and divisive subject in U.S. politics Generously supported by: the Davis Fund for Russian Area Studies. Co-sponsored by the History Department. Image credit: Angela Stent

Education & Learning

Before the Graphic Memoir: Female Sketchbooks and Visual Chronicles of Love and War

10.24.19 at 4:30 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

Yale University Professor Katie Trumpener discusses the prehistory of the graphic novel by examining artists, works, and genres ranging from alternative press cartoons to Japanese American internment memoirs to Native American ledger books and contemporary West German graphic memoirs. For more information, please contact: Lauren Cote, lcote2@wellesley.edu Generously supported by: the Newhouse Center for the Humanities and the English Department. Image Credit: Courtesy of the Japanese American National Museum, gift of Miné Okubo Estate, 2007.62. Image Caption: Miné Okubo, Waiting in lines, Tanforan Assembly Center, San Bruno, California (1942). Drawing (detail).

Education & Learning

Trace: Memory, History, Race and the American Landscape

10.25.19 at 12:30 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

A Reading and Discussion by Lauret Savoy Lauret Savoy, an author and professor of environmental studies and geology at Mount Holyoke College, joins the Newhouse Center and the Paulson Ecology of Place Initiative for a collaborative exploration of our land and our stories. Her writing explores ties between American lands and the stories we tell of them. Her 2015 book Trace: Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape won the 2016 American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation and the 2017 ASLE Creative Writing Award. It was also a finalist for a PEN American Book Award. For more information, please contact: Lauren Cote, lcote2@wellesley.edu Image Credit: the Newhouse Center for the Humanities and the Paulson Ecology of Place Initiative. Image Caption: Lauret Savoy

Education & Learning

Family Day at the Davis: Dream Home

10.26.19 at 11:00 AM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

During this free, family-friendly event, explore technology through hands-on activities. Join us for a treasure hunt in the galleries; engage in hands-on art activities, including photomontage and mini dyeing projects; take an interactive family tour of the special exhibition Fatimah Tuggar: Home’s Horizons; meet CGI (computer-generated imagery) students; and join us for robot story time (1:30-2pm), where we’ll listen to stories and sing songs with the Wellesley Free Library NAO robot! For more information, please contact: 781-283-2051

Education & Learning

William E. Wallace, “Michelangelo, God’s Architect”

10.28.19 at 5:30 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

Dr. Ruth Morris Bakwin Class of 1919 Art Lecture This year’s Dr. Ruth Morris Bakwin Class of 1919 lecture will be given by William E. Wallace, the Barbara Murphy Bryant Distinguished Professor of Art History at Washington University and an internationally renowned scholar of the Italian Renaissance artist Michelangelo Buonarroti. Wallace will offer new insights into this remarkably creative individual and explain how, in the last decades of his long life, Michelangelo was busier and more creative than ever. He not only transformed the practice of architecture, but also reshaped St. Peter’s Basilica and the skyline of Rome. For more information, please contact: Jacki Musacchio, jmusacch@wellesley.edu Image Caption: St. Peter’s Basilica

Education & Learning

2019 Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Lecture: Jabari Asim

10.31.19 at 5:30 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

The MLK Jr. Memorial lecture is an annual Wellesley event that pays tribute to the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. and his enormous contribution to advancing civil rights in the United State by leading and inspiring legislative, administrative, behavioral, and attitudinal changes. The 2019 lecture will be given by Jabari Asim, associate professor of writing, literature, and publishing at Emerson College in Boston and executive editor of The Crisis, the NAACP’s flagship journal of politics, ideas, and culture. He is the author of six books for adults and nine for children. His most recent works are Only the Strong (2015), A Child's Introduction to African American History (2018), and We Can’t Breathe (2018). For more information, please contact: Lizette Rodriguez-Ponce, arodrig9@wellesley.edu Image Caption: Jabari Asim

Education & Learning

Newhouse Faculty Series: Rebecca Summerhays

11.04.19 at 4:30 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

The Novel on the Defensive: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, William Paley’s Natural Theology, and the Human Machine Newhouse Center faculty fellow Rebecca Summerhays, a visiting lecturer in the Writing Program, discusses her ongoing research project. Her research interests include Victorian fiction, natural history, evolutionary theory, narrative theory, and feminist theory. Representations of Victor Frankenstein’s monster, both popular and critical, refuse to see him whole. That is, in both film and theory, the creature is either a hideous body or a beautiful mind, but rarely both. Summerhays argues instead that the monster embodies the grim truth of human life in the mechanical age: to survive industrialization, workers had to become more machine than human, physically and psychically bound by what Shelley describes as “mechanical impulse” to other workers and the machines they operated. To make this argument, Summerhays reads Shelley’s novel as a critical response to William Paley’s enormously popular (if all-but-forgotten) creationist “classic,” Natural Theology (1802). Natural Theology is remarkable for its attempt to consecrate machinery, requiring readers to worship all bodies, including their own, as miniature versions of the factories, mills, and refineries springing up around Britain. For Shelley, the biomechanical world that Paley romanticizes places the novel form on the defensive. How did the novel subsequently evolve in the early nineteenth century, when machine deposed the mind as the seat of human consciousness and life itself?

Education & Learning

The Harry Halverson Lecture on American Architecture: Pamela Karimi

11.05.19 at 5:00 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

Black Spaces Matter: Learning from an Abolitionist Neighborhood Architect and architectural historian Pamela Karimi, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, deploys a teaching methodology that engages with the university's surrounding communities. Using the historic architecture of New Bedford, Mass. as a springboard, Karimi considers issues vital for the sustainable renewal of the built environment in the context of the American Post-industrial city. A key contribution in this vein is the Black Spaces Matter traveling exhibition that she organized in collaboration with local experts, students, and residents in order to showcase the extraordinary history of New Bedford in the abolitionist movement. This talk presents some of these activities. Pamela Karimi is an architect and an architectural historian. Her work spans two fields of inquiry. The first is architecture and visual culture of the modern Middle East. The second is design and sustainability in North America. She is the author of Domesticity and Consumer Culture in Iran: Interior Revolutions of the Modern Era and co-editor of Images of the Child and Childhood in Modern Muslim Contexts, Reinventing the American Post-Industrial City & The Destruction of Cultural Heritage in the Middle East: From Napoleon to ISIS. Her major curatorial projects include Urban Renewal and Creative Economy in Massachusetts Gateway Cities at the New Bedford Art Museum, Black Spaces Matter at the BAC’s McCormick Gallery and Stateless: Artists Respond to the Refugee Crisis in the University Art Gallery at UMass Dartmouth. In 2018 she received the Manning Prize for Excellence in Teaching. Karimi is the co-founder of Aggregate Architectural History Collaborative. Generously supported by: The Harry Halverson Lecture Fund Image Credit: Pamela Karimi Image Caption: Gallery Image, Black Spaces Matter: Exploring the Aesthetics and Architectonics of an Abolitionist Neighborhood, McCormick Gallery, Boston Architectural College, November, 2017 to January 2018

Education & Learning

Educator Workshop at the Davis

11.06.19 at 3:30 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

The Davis welcomes local K-12 educators for a workshop focused on utilizing resources from our permanent collections and the special exhibition, Fatimah Tuggar: Home’s Horizons. Explore how to connect the themes and works of art on view with your classroom curricula. Participation is free, but advance registration is required. Please e-mail Arthurina Fears at afears@wellesley.edu to reserve your space. For more information, please contact: Arthurina Fears, afears@wellesley.edu. Generously supported by: the Palley Endowment Fund for Davis Museum Outreach Programs.

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