Events

Have an event to share?

Click here to add an event to the calendar

Education & Learning

Gods and Robots: Myths and Ancient Dreams of Technology

03.03.20 at 3:30 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

A Lecture by Adrienne Mayor Who first imagined robots? As early as Homer, Greek myths envisioned automated servants, self-moving devices, and AI—and grappled with ethical concerns about technology. This talk explores how some of today’s most advanced innovations in robotics and artificial intelligence were foreshadowed in classical antiquity. Adrienne Mayor is a research scholar in classics and the history of science at Stanford University. Her most recent book is Gods and Robots: Myths, Machines, and Ancient Dreams of Technology; other books include The First Fossil Hunters, The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women; and a biography of Mithradates, The Poison King (National Book Award finalist). Co-sponsored by the Newhouse Center for the Humanities, the Department of Classical Studies, and the Department of Computer Science.

Education & Learning

Boston’s King Incident of 1905

03.05.20 at 4:30 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

Chinese Students and the Intersectionality of Race and Class In this lecture, Emma J. Teng examines the King incident of 1905, in which four Chinese students were detained and denied landing at the port of Boston. She will discuss the role of this incident in contestations over immigration law to elucidate the conflicted position of Chinese elites – disempowered by race yet empowered by class status – under Exclusion. An international controversy involving the detention of four wealthy students seeking to enter the US at Boston, the King case touched off public protest from Euro-American elites and business contingents and also pushed forward the American Boycott movement in Shanghai. The case served as a key triggering incident in the pivot away from the movement for a wholesale “Chinese ban” toward the institutionalization of class discernment in US immigration policy. An examination of this case helps restore our understanding of the agency of individual Chinese elites in the political negotiations that shaped Chinese Exclusion as both obstruction and flow, and contributes to the analysis of the dynamic intersectionality of race and class under this border regime. Emma Teng is the T.T. and Wei Fong Chao Professor of Asian Civilization at MIT. She teaches courses in Chinese culture, Chinese migration history, Asian American history, East Asian culture, and women's and gender studies. Generously supported by: the Newhouse Center for the Humanities and the department of East Asian language and cultures.

Education & Learning

Meritocracy and Its Discontents

03.06.20 at 4:00 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

A conversation between Glenn Loury and Daniel Markovits about meritocracy, its promises of fairness and equality, and its troubled past and present, moderated by Wellesley sociologist Kelly Rutherford. Can the United States be characterized as a meritocracy, given increasing levels of income inequality? Should it even aspire to be one? How did meritocracy emerge as an ideal for contemporary society, and are there alternatives that would serve our citizenry better? Glenn Loury, the Merton P. Stolz Professor of the Social Sciences and professor of economics at Brown University, writes widely on such topics as race, social mobility, and criminal justice. Daniel Markovits is the Guido Calabresi Professor of Law at Yale Law School. He specializes in legal ethics and the moral foundations of law. His most recent book is The Meritocracy Trap (2019). Kelly Rutherford, associate professor of sociology at Wellesley, studies the effects of neoliberal policies and rising social inequality on families and parenting. For more information, please contact: Caryn Sowa, csowa@wellesley.edu. Generously supported by: The Freedom Project. Image Caption: Daniel Markovits and Glenn Loury.

Education & Learning

Educator Workshop

03.12.20 at 3:30 PM - Wellesley College
106 Central Street Wellesley, MA 02482
Website
Free

The Davis welcomes local K-12 educators for a workshop focused on utilizing resources from our permanent collections and special exhibitions. Explore how to connect the themes and works of art on view with your classroom curricula. Participation is free. Advance registration is required. Please e-mail Arthurina Fears, curator of education and programs, at afears@wellesley.edu. Generously supported by: the Palley Endowment Fund for Davis Museum Outreach Programs.

Select a venue or enter a new venue name and address.


Width: 256px, Height: 256px