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Education & Learning

Tinytropolis

04.20.21 - The Discovery Museum
177 Main St. Acton, MA 01720
Website
Included with admission; $15.50

Come visit the mini city with a big future! Join us as we design, build, and explore a mini city constructed completely out of cardboard and creativity. This changing and evolving temporary space will be put together by staff and visitors over the course of 8 days. This program will take place during all visitation blocks, April 17 - April 25, Closed Monday, April 19.

Education & Learning

Virtual Even — The Addiction Inoculation: Raising Healthy Kids in a Culture of Dependence

04.28.21 at 7:00 PM - The Discovery Museum
177 Main St. Acton, MA 01720
Website
Free, donation appreciated

The Discovery Museum Virtual Speaker Series welcomes New York Times best-selling author Jessica Lahey, via Zoom Webinar, to discuss substance abuse prevention—based on her research in child welfare, psychology, substance abuse, and developmental neuroscience—and provide evidence-based strategies and practical tools parents and caregivers need in order to understand, support, and educate resilient, addiction-resistant children. The event is free, but registration is required.

Education & Learning

Climate Talk: Tracking seasonal changes; Opportunities and challenges in a changing climate (Live Webinar)

04.29.21 at 6:30 PM - Tower Hill Botanic Garden
11 French Drive Boylston
Website
$10 members / $15 non-members

Climate Talk: Tracking seasonal changes; Opportunities and challenges in a changing climate (Live Webinar) Thursday, April 29, 2021, 6:30-7:30 PM Instructor: Sarah Bois, PhD $10 members / $15 non-members Tower Hill Botanic Garden is dedicated to understanding the ways climate change impacts our world and exploring methods we can use to combat its effects and improve our climate outlook. "Climate Talks" are an opportunity to connect with experts in the field to learn and understand the current effects of climate change and explore ways we can make a difference. This climate talk will discuss the anticipated consequences of climate change already seen in our region include early spring warmup. Tracking the seasonal changes around us can help us understand what’s happening in our own yards and neighborhoods. Dr. Sarah Bois will discuss the research findings that are on-going at the Linda Loring Nature Foundation investigating seasonal changes of common shrubs on Nantucket Island. She will also discuss ways to bring this type of research into your own yard, classroom, and favorite natural areas. The data we gather together, both new and historic, can help provide a bigger picture of climate change in action in our region and beyond. Dr. Sarah Bois is the Director of Research and Education for the Linda Loring Nature Foundation (LLNF) on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts. As a plant ecologist, her research has focused on a myriad of conservation and biodiversity topics including non-native invasive species, native shrub response to climate change, coastal vulnerability and resiliency, native pollinator diversity, and rare species conservation. In her current position, Sarah oversees management of 275 acres of conservation land which consists of rare species habitat. Her position at LLNF marries her interests in research, education, and stewardship where she leverages research experiences into educational opportunities. Sarah received her PhD from the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Connecticut. Single class scheduled on 4/29/2021 at 6:30PM

Education & Learning

Climate Talk: What Alpine Plants in New England are telling us about Climate Change (Live Webinar)

05.12.21 at 6:30 PM - Tower Hill Botanic Garden
11 French Drive Boylston
Website
$10 members / $15 non-members

Climate Talk: What Alpine Plants in New England are telling us about Climate Change (Live Webinar) This program will be held virtually. Once you register you will receive a zoom link in the confirmation. This webinar will also be RECORDED and available for 2 months to all registrants. Wednesday, May 12, 2021, 6:30-7:30 PM Instructor: Kristen Haynes $10 members / $15 non-members Tower Hill Botanic Garden is dedicated to understanding the ways climate change impacts our world and exploring methods we can use to combat its effects and improve our climate outlook. "Climate Talks" are an opportunity to connect with experts in the field to learn and understand the current effects of climate change and explore ways we can make a difference. This climate talk will explore the current global biodiversity crisis caused by environmental change. The effects of this change make it critical for our communities to determine what our conservation priorities will be, especially when we understand which plants are the most vulnerable to extinction. This talk will discuss one study of alpine plants of the mountains of the Northeast (rare alpine rattlesnake-root plants -Nabalus spp., Syn: Prenanthes spp.-) to understand how they will respond to ongoing environmental change. Through this study we can develop and use a framework for understanding the climate change vulnerability of certain plant species and develop plans for managing those species during climate change. Kristen Haynes, PHD is an ecologist and plant biologist whose work focuses on climate change conservation. Kristen’s interest in environmental issues began with early experiences in the Adirondack Mountains in northern New York State, and grew through involvement with her high school's Envirothon team. Kristen studied Natural Resources at Cornell University and then pursued a PhD at SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry. Currently, as the Assistant Director of SUNY Oswego’s Rice Creek Field Station, Kristen is co-leading a project aiming to restore native tree species to New York State’s canal region for ecosystem, climate, and cultural benefits. Single class scheduled on 5/12/2021 at 6:30PM

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