Wildlife

Sanctuaries and refuges offer family activities, classes, trails, butterfly and bird gardens, and educational centers.

Animal Adventures

Animal Adventures

336 Sugar Road, Bolton 01740

978-779-8988

Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge and Visitors Center

Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge and Visitors Center

680 Hudson Road, Sudbury 01776

978-562-3614 

Maple Farm Sanctuary

Maple Farm Sanctuary

101 North Avenue, Mendon 01756

508-473-7539

Mass Audubon’s Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary

Mass Audubon’s Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary

280 Eliot Street, Natick 01760

508-655-2296 

Nine miles of trails through woodlands, meadows, and wetlands invite you to experience nature. Changing seasons and a variety of wildlife means there’s always something new to see. Visit our energy-efficient nature center and accessible boardwalk.

Mass Audubon’s Drumlin Farm Wildlife Sanctuary

Mass Audubon’s Drumlin Farm Wildlife Sanctuary

208 South Great Road, Lincoln 01773

781-259-2200

Experience life on a working farm and explore a wildlife sanctuary at the same time. Visit our farm animals, walk our nature trails, see how crops are sustainably grown, and observe resident native wildlife.

Mass Audubon’s Stony Brook Wildlife Sanctuary

Mass Audubon’s Stony Brook Wildlife Sanctuary

108 North Street, Norfolk 02056

508-528-3140

With an extensive boardwalk system through forest, fields, and wetlands, Stony Brook offers up-close views of wildlife above and under the water. Enjoy Nature Play Area, two miles of trails, and butterfly and bird garden.

Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary

Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary

690 Linden Street, Boylston 01505

 

Waseeka Wildlife Sanctuary

Waseeka Wildlife Sanctuary

Clinton Street, Hopkinton  01748

978-464-2712 
 

Recreation - Fall Walking Trail

Recreation - BAA Start

Recreation - Bowditch

Community Spotlight - Milford

Settled as part of the town of Mendon in 1662, Milford made a name for itself as an early New England mill and mining town. Conveniently located on the Charles, Mill, and Blackstone rivers, the town utilized its natural resources to drive its early economic rise.

 

In addition to ample waterpower, the area yielded large deposits of beautiful pink Milford granite, discovered in 1870. Highly sought after, the polished stone was utilized in projects the world over and was even used in the building of the Washington Monument and the original Penn Station in New York City.

 

Just as Milford’s geography played a large part in the town’s early success, so too has its location provided a push for its latest revitalization over the past half-century. As the town’s economy stalled in the middle part of the 20th century, many residents made their way to other areas in search of work. Luckily, in 1969, Interstate 495 was built, making Milford easily accessible to this new corridor of transportation. Since then, the growing town has been moving at highway speeds.

 

Milford is still all about growth, especially growing locally, and you don’t have to look any farther than CraftRoots Brewing for proof. Not satisfied with simply joining in on the emerging craft beer scene, the local brewery and taproom was named the fastest growing brewery in the entire nation in 2018.

 

Community events continue to grow as well, with the inaugural July 4th parade in 2018 and the Celebrate Milford festival now in its third successful year.